3D printing and education: fast tracking the future of tomorrow

Published at May 26, 2017, in Technology

Innovative institutions ahead of the curve have taken advantage of the narrowing gap in cost between digital and 3D printers.

Thanks to software such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), 3D printing has regenerated the education sector, with some schools enrolling students as young as six into introductory 3D printing courses.

3D printing, otherwise known as additive manufacturing, is becoming a primary educational tool as schools across the globe adopt 3D learning models to cater to a growing demand in STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics) based curricula.

Government initiatives around the world are now putting 3D technology in the hands of students to provide skills for the future.

Education based interest in the 3D movement is, in part, responsible for the rapid growth of the market which was valued at around $3-$6 billion dollars in 2016, and has been projected to exceed $17 billion by 2020.

Whilst the benefits of 3D printers in education are numerous and substantial, such advancements could not be delivered in the absence of willing suppliers.


Thankfully, several companies have recognised the growing demand, and have looked to establish a foothold in what could become a lucrative market.

One such company is Robo 3D (ASX: RBO), who is tapping into the world of innovative education.

Before we go too far, we should note that this is an early stage tech stock, and investors should seek professional financial advice if considering for their portfolio.

Founded in 2012, the ASX listed company is bringing education to life in classrooms across the US, where it has already partnered with the world’s leading contract manufacturer for consumer electronics in Foxconn.

In addition, Robo 3D recently signed an agreement with WYNIT Distribution, a leading North American distributor of emerging technologies geared around educational curriculum.

With an unrivalled retail footprint in the US, Robo 3D is set to expand their reach into other countries, taking the advancements in education with them.

Over 800,000 units of its newest model, the Robo R-2, are already pre-ordered.

Robo 3D’s dedication to reworking the classroom is reflected in its business model, which takes into account the rapid rise in demand for STEAM.

As government initiatives further encourage the implementation of 3D printing technology, the company continues to fortify its market position, recently launching an unparalleled education network, as seen below.

Offering exceptional support to teachers will enable more schools to introduce the world class technology, in a plan designed to make 3D printers an established asset in the classroom.

The outlook for education is therefore a very bright one.

S3 Consortium Pty Ltd (CAR No.433913) is a corporate authorised representative of LeMessurier Securities Pty Ltd (AFSL No. 296877). The information contained in this article is general information only. Any advice is general advice only. Neither your personal objectives, financial situation nor needs have been taken into consideration. Accordingly you should consider how appropriate the advice (if any) is to those objectives, financial situation and needs, before acting on the advice.

Conflict of Interest Notice

S3 Consortium Pty Ltd does and seeks to do business with companies featured in its articles. As a result, investors should be aware that the Firm may have a conflict of interest that could affect the objectivity of this article. Investors should consider this article as only a single factor in making any investment decision. The publishers of this article also wish to disclose that they may hold this stock in their portfolios and that any decision to purchase this stock should be done so after the purchaser has made their own inquires as to the validity of any information in this article.

Publishers Notice

The information contained in this article is current at the finalised date. The information contained in this article is based on sources reasonably considered to be reliable by S3 Consortium Pty Ltd, and available in the public domain. No “insider information” is ever sourced, disclosed or used by S3 Consortium.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn